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These 4 Measures Indicate That Cinemark Holdings (NYSE:CNK) Is Using Debt Extensively

Simply Wall St

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. Importantly, Cinemark Holdings, Inc. ( NYSE:CNK ) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Cinemark Holdings

How Much Debt Does Cinemark Holdings Carry?

As you can see below, Cinemark Holdings had US$1.93b of debt at March 2019, down from US$2.06b a year prior. On the flip side, it has US$425.2m in cash leading to net debt of about US$1.50b.

NYSE:CNK Historical Debt, August 2nd 2019

How Healthy Is Cinemark Holdings's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Cinemark Holdings had liabilities of US$657.0m due within 12 months, and liabilities of US$3.67b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had US$425.2m in cash and US$89.3m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$3.81b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

This deficit is considerable relative to its market capitalization of US$4.57b, so it does suggest shareholders should keep an eye on Cinemark Holdings's use of debt. This suggests shareholders would heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Cinemark Holdings has net debt worth 2.2 times EBITDA, which isn't too much, but its interest cover looks a bit on the low side, with EBIT at only 3.6 times the interest expense. While these numbers do not alarm us, it's worth noting that the cost of the company's debt is having a real impact. Cinemark Holdings grew its EBIT by 3.6% in the last year. That's far from incredible but it is a good thing, when it comes to paying off debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Cinemark Holdings's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts .

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. In the last three years, Cinemark Holdings's free cash flow amounted to 40% of its EBIT, less than we'd expect. That's not great, when it comes to paying down debt.

Our View

Both Cinemark Holdings's level of total liabilities and its interest cover were discouraging. At least its EBIT growth rate gives us reason to be optimistic. Taking the abovementioned factors together we do think Cinemark Holdings's debt poses some risks to the business. So while that leverage does boost returns on equity, we wouldn't really want to see it increase from here. Given our hesitation about the stock, it would be good to know if Cinemark Holdings insiders have sold any shares recently. You click here to find out if insiders have sold recently .

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free , right now.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com . This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.