CNA.L - Centrica plc

LSE - LSE Delayed Price. Currency in GBp
75.84
+1.06 (+1.42%)
At close: 4:38PM BST
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Previous Close 74.78
Open 74.82
Bid 75.92 x 0
Ask 75.96 x 0
Day's Range 74.76 - 76.17
52 Week Range 63.99 - 156.65
Volume 22,952,357
Avg. Volume 28,525,809
Market Cap 4.413B
Beta (3Y Monthly) 0.46
PE Ratio (TTM) N/A
EPS (TTM) -10.70
Earnings Date Feb 18, 2019 - Feb 28, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield 0.10 (13.24%)
Ex-Dividend Date 2019-10-10
1y Target Est 153.87
  • Britain, Show Us Growth, Not Cash
    Bloomberg

    Britain, Show Us Growth, Not Cash

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Reality is beginning to bite in the FTSE 100 as some high-yielding stocks give up on generous dividends. But many British companies are still continuing to offer jaw-dropping payouts when what investors really crave is growth.The dividend culture of the FTSE 100 has long been an oddity. Its investors have received a far higher proportion of their total returns from income over the last two decades than if they had invested in, say, the S&P 500 over the same period.With dividends a very British symbol of corporate confidence, boards are reluctant to cut them even when it might be wise to do so. So the FTSE 100 culture has been self-reinforcing.This year has brought some signs of change. Centrica Plc slashed its payout last week. Analysts had expected the utility to announce a deep cut, but not by nearly 60%. Vodafone Group Plc snipped its dividend in May. And last month, tobacco giant Imperial Brands Plc dropped a commitment to grow its payout 10% annually.Yet even now, these companies’ share prices look superficially cheap on a dividend basis, with yields (the dividend divided by the share price) of between 6% and 10%.Indeed, such ratios are nowadays pretty common in the U.K. The average dividend for the top 15 highest-yielding stocks is worth 9% of the share price. The standard explanation – that this signals dividend cuts in the coming years – doesn’t fit very well. Take analysts’ predictions for dividends in three years; even with some cuts forecast, the average yield for this group is still 9%.This is especially odd in a low-rate environment. Yields on some government bonds and high-rated corporate debt are negative or zero. Surely income investors would buy these dividend stocks if the return provided by their annual cash payouts was only 5% rather than double that level? Wouldn’t that provide sufficient compensation for the added risk?One explanation is simply that international investors just don’t care for yield anymore. Domestic U.K. income funds probably would be willing to pay more for these stocks and bid down their yields. But this group isn’t driving the market. Global investors are. They covet growth and don’t want exposure to the U.K. until there’s clarity about Brexit. The average expected increase in sales over the next two years for the top-15 yielding U.K. blue-chip stocks is under two percent. Of course, if the companies aren’t growing, it’s likely because of past under-investment caused by overly-generous dividends. But cutting dividends now to invest in growth won’t pay off for some time and would only infuriate the small pool of domestic investors who actually like the income. Meanwhile, global investors sit on the sidelines and company managers stand frozen like a deer in the headlights.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Stephanie Baker at stebaker@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of CNA.L earnings conference call or presentation 30-Jul-19 8:00am GMT

    Half Year 2019 Centrica PLC Earnings Call

  • Moody's

    Centrica plc -- Moody's changes outlook on Centrica to negative; affirms ratings

    Moody's Investors Service (Moody's) has today changed to negative from stable the outlook on Centrica plc (Centrica). Concurrently, Moody's has affirmed the Baa1 issuer and senior unsecured ratings, and the Baa3 junior subordinated debt ratings of Centrica.

  • Is There An Opportunity With Centrica plc's (LON:CNA) 47% Undervaluation?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is There An Opportunity With Centrica plc's (LON:CNA) 47% Undervaluation?

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Centrica plc (LON:CNA) by taking the expected...

  • Direct Energy Offers Texans Twelve Hours of Free Power and a Hive View Smart Indoor Camera
    PR Newswire

    Direct Energy Offers Texans Twelve Hours of Free Power and a Hive View Smart Indoor Camera

    HOUSTON, July 2, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Today Direct Energy announces a new 24-month fixed-price electricity plan that includes 12 hours of free power from 9 pm to 9 am and a Hive View smart indoor camera. "Doing laundry, running the dishwasher and running the air conditioner at night are easy ways for our customers to make an impact on their electric bills with this new plan," said Bruce Stewart, President of Direct Energy Home.

  • How Financially Strong Is Centrica plc (LON:CNA)?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Financially Strong Is Centrica plc (LON:CNA)?

    Small-cap and large-cap companies receive a lot of attention from investors, but mid-cap stocks like Centrica plc...

  • Centrica plc (LON:CNA): Time For A Financial Health Check
    Simply Wall St.

    Centrica plc (LON:CNA): Time For A Financial Health Check

    Small and large cap stocks are widely popular for a variety of reasons, however, mid-cap companies such as Centrica...

  • Based On Its ROE, Is Centrica plc (LON:CNA) A High Quality Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    Based On Its ROE, Is Centrica plc (LON:CNA) A High Quality Stock?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • Reuters

    IBM, Cera Care to test self-driving car tech in elder homes

    IBM and British start-up Cera Care plan a six-month pilot to test whether lidar laser sensors, used to help self-driving cars "see", can enable elderly people to stay in their homes for longer - without compromising privacy. Lidar systems that work by using laser light pulses to render fine-grained images of surroundings, have typically been used to make high-resolution maps, catch speeding motorists and more recently help automated cars navigate through the streets. Jack Narcotta, a senior smart home analyst at Strategy Analytics, said lidar lasers were one of the more advanced solutions for elderly monitoring, but were still in the very early stages.

  • Reuters

    Investors slap discount on UK utilities amid election worries

    British utility stocks are trading at a growing discount to euro zone peers as investors fear the country's deepening political crisis could trigger a general election that ushers in renationalisation of the industry, worth $76 billion (£59.9 billion). The opposition Labour Party has said it wants to nationalise energy and water infrastructure if it can oust Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservatives from power, reversing decades of pro-privatisation policies. Simon Webber, lead portfolio manager on the global and international equities team at Schroders said those fears were "another overhang" for utilities, already subject to a discount like other UK assets because of Brexit uncertainty.