• Dow Jones Futures: Will China Trade Deal Spur Stock Market Rally? Apple At Highs, Microsoft, Google, Nvidia Near Buys
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Will China Trade Deal Spur Stock Market Rally? Apple At Highs, Microsoft, Google, Nvidia Near Buys

    Stock futures: Will the China trade deal spur the stock market to record highs like Apple? Microsoft, Google, Nvidia, Facebook, Visa are near buys.

  • Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On IQVIA Holdings, Inc. (IQV)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On IQVIA Holdings, Inc. (IQV)

    There are several ways to beat the market, and investing in small cap stocks has historically been one of them. We like to improve the odds of beating the market further by examining what famous hedge fund operators such as Jeff Ubben, George Soros and Carl Icahn think. Those hedge fund operators make billions of […]

  • Benzinga

    Can Netflix Deliver A Hit After Q2 Subscriber Disappointment?

    Netflix Inc (NASDAQ: NFLX) is scheduled to report its third-quarter results Tuesday, after the market close. Analysts, on average, expect the company to report revenues of $5.25 billion, up 31.30% year-over-year. Over the past four quarters, Netflix has managed to beat earnings per expectations by an average of 24.08%.

  • Trade war pause, retail sales, bank earnings – What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    Trade war pause, retail sales, bank earnings – What to know in the week ahead

    The coming week’s docket of economic reports and earnings releases comes just following the Trump administration’s announcement of a partial trade deal with China late last week.

  • Jaguars' Shad Khan: 'It's taken a while' for NFL owners to warm to betting
    Yahoo Finance

    Jaguars' Shad Khan: 'It's taken a while' for NFL owners to warm to betting

    “The NFL has really been obsessed with the integrity of the sport," the owner of the Jacksonville Jaguars said.

  • Have Insiders Been Selling Adobe Inc. (NASDAQ:ADBE) Shares?
    Simply Wall St.

    Have Insiders Been Selling Adobe Inc. (NASDAQ:ADBE) Shares?

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. The flip side of that is...

  • Financial Times

    Global regulators put pressure on Libra with enhanced scrutiny

    Facebook’s plans for a digital currency are coming under further pressure as global regulators step up their scrutiny of the troubled Libra project. In a letter to G20 finance ministers on Sunday, Randal Quarles, the head of the global Financial Stability Board, said that, with a “host of challenges” posed by global “stablecoins”, such as Libra, “possible regulatory gaps should be assessed and addressed as a matter of priority”. This, the letter said, created challenges including financial stability, consumer and investor protection, data privacy, money laundering, terrorist financing, fair competition, cyber security and tax evasion.

  • Financial Times

    Bill Gates expresses regret over meetings with Jeffrey Epstein

    The world’s second-richest man said in a statement through a spokesperson that he recognised it was “an error in judgment” ever to have met Epstein, who committed suicide two months ago while facing charges of trafficking underage girls. This had given Epstein “an undeserved platform”. Mr Gates is among several prominent figures to have moved in recent weeks to distance themselves from Epstein, who cultivated a network of rich and powerful associates from business, academia, politics and royalty.

  • Benzinga

    Mike Khouw's Netflix Options Trade

    On CNBC's "Options Action," Mike Khouw suggested investors should consider a put spread calendar options strategy in Netflix Inc (NASDAQ: NFLX ) ahead of earnings. The company is reporting earnings ...

  • Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Twilio Inc. (TWLO)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Twilio Inc. (TWLO)

    At Insider Monkey we track the activity of some of the best-performing hedge funds like Appaloosa Management, Baupost, and Tiger Global because we determined that some of the stocks that they are collectively bullish on can help us generate returns above the broader indices. Out of thousands of stocks that hedge funds invest in, small-caps […]

  • Netflix stock has fallen 30% in 3 months but its valuation is still irrational
    MarketWatch

    Netflix stock has fallen 30% in 3 months but its valuation is still irrational

    Reality is closing in on Netflix. With the stock (NFLX) down 30% over the past three months, poor second-quarter results and signs that third-quarter subscriber numbers (which the company reports on Oct. 16) might be below expectations, the market is no longer buying CEO Reed Hasting’s previous ridiculous claims like that Fortnite and YouTube are Netflix’s primary competitors. While the “sell side” remains bullish, with 70% of Wall Street analysts tracked by FactSet calling Netflix a buy, independent investors are increasingly skeptical of the company’s growth story.

  • Why no streaming company will be able to dethrone Netflix
    MarketWatch

    Why no streaming company will be able to dethrone Netflix

    For investors, it could be a costly mistake to be on the wrong side of that debate if Netflix’s stock price marches toward a record $419. The streaming service has done an excellent job penetrating Western Europe, which has fast broadband speeds.

  • Do Hedge Funds Love Burlington Stores Inc (BURL)?
    Insider Monkey

    Do Hedge Funds Love Burlington Stores Inc (BURL)?

    The elite funds run by legendary investors such as David Tepper and Dan Loeb make hundreds of millions of dollars for themselves and their investors by spending enormous resources doing research on small cap stocks that big investment banks don't follow. Because of their pay structures, they have strong incentives to do the research necessary […]

  • Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Tradeweb Markets Inc. (TW)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Tradeweb Markets Inc. (TW)

    At Insider Monkey, we pore over the filings of nearly 750 top investment firms every quarter, a process we have now completed for the latest reporting period. The data we've gathered as a result gives us access to a wealth of collective knowledge based on these firms' portfolio holdings as of June 28. In this […]

  • Microsoft looks like the ‘safest’ bet among big software stocks, says analyst
    MarketWatch

    Microsoft looks like the ‘safest’ bet among big software stocks, says analyst

    Sky-high valuations for software stocks necessitate a more defensive view of the industry, according to Jefferies analyst Brent Thill, and Microsoft Corp. shares look like the “safest” play.

  • Roku stock has quadrupled this year – but RBC sees 30% upside
    MarketWatch

    Roku stock has quadrupled this year – but RBC sees 30% upside

    Roku Inc.’s stock has surged 300% so far this year, but RBC Capital Markets now argues that the shares have more room to run.

  • Bloomberg

    Starbucks Stores That Only Accept Mobile Orders Sure Beat the Line

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- How worried should we be about Starbucks’s recent announcement that it plans to begin testing a new type of store that only takes orders via mobile app — no cashiers?At first glance the image seems vaguely dystopian: person after person filing through, inevitably wearing AirPods, to pick up caffeine-and-sugar infusions they ordered by pressing a few buttons on their smartphones as they were leaving home — all without a moment of human interaction.(1)But that’s more or less what’s happening right now at regular Starbucks stores: the company already accepts mobile orders, and has more than 16 million mobile users. The drawback is that those users crowd the stores and cause bottlenecks at peak times; in some outlets, the glut of mobile orders has gotten so bad that it’s discouraging walk-in customers. Thus, the mobile-only store model is presumably a response to problems already created by mobile ordering.Experiments of this kind are increasingly common. Amazon Go stores are cashier-less. Some grocery stores let you scan items as you pick them up and economize on checkout time. And mobile ordering is becoming widespread for foods ranging from salad to lobster. So we might not be too far away from the day when mobile ordering and cashier-less purchasing are the norm, rather than the exception.Will we be better off for it?In Starbucks’s case, at least, mobile-only stores might actually work out well for customers. Those who want to order via mobile will be able to go to specialized stores optimized for handling them. And that will reduce congestion at other stores, meaning that people there won’t have to spend as much time waiting for their drinks.As with many forms of product differentiation, the change might even increase demand for Starbucks coffee. Anyone who previously found Starbucks too time-consuming to stop in during their morning commutes will have a new, faster option. And people who had been driven off by the throngs of mobile-order customers might be able to come back.It’s less clear, however, how mobile-only stores will affect Starbucks employees.Some activists are trying to push for laws that would put limits on the shift to cashier-less shopping, requiring that stores must have humans on hand to ring up customer orders. That’s an onerous proposal — analogous to saying that every ATM should also have a bank teller on hand.(2)But still, you can see why there’s concern. Presumably, cashier-less stores will need fewer employees, even if they do pull in a large number of new customers. And reducing congestion in regular Starbucks stores might reduce staffing needs there as well.Then there's the drudgery factor: Working in a mobile-only store will surely be a lot more monotonous, more like being employed on a factory assembly line than in a typical coffee shop, where give-and-take between workers and customers can be part of the appeal. There will be less human interaction – and what interactions there are might well be with upset customers.It’s also likely that the workers at mobile-only stores won’t make nearly as much in tips. First off, customers might not feel an obligation to employees they don’t interact with personally. Moreover, tipping using an app isn’t observable to others, and there’s solid evidence that people take prosocial actions more frequently when others are watching.  In other words, people tend to tip more when they know they're being observed.That said, the Starbucks app’s default tipping options are on the order of 10% to 20% -- higher than many people give with the typical change-in-jar approach. So if Starbucks pushes app tipping hard with notifications and alerts, there might not be too much of a shortfall. Better would be to still have a physical tip jar in mobile stores — or even to place a star on the order display board next to the name of anyone who tips.So there’s a chance that mobile-only Starbucks might be beneficial overall, rather than dystopian. Or at least not as dystopian as the pumpkin-spice latte.(1) I mean, isn’t that basically one of the opening scenes of the movie "Equilibrium"?(2) And what about completely automated coffee shops like those now operating in San Francisco?To contact the author of this story: Scott Duke Kominers at skominers1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Scott Duke Kominers is the MBA Class of 1960 Associate Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, and a faculty affiliate of the Harvard Department of Economics. Previously, he was a junior fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and the inaugural research scholar at the Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at the University of Chicago.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • For hedge funds, software-as-a-service stocks are the new FAANG
    MarketWatch

    For hedge funds, software-as-a-service stocks are the new FAANG

    Hedge funds have led a quiet rotation from consumer-facing tech shares into enterprise-software stocks

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]Microsoft, Intel and Others Benefit from Better-Than-Expected Business PC Sales

    Though CPU shortages are still an issue for the PC industry, an uptick in business PC demand is helping out a number of firms.

  • Barrons.com

    Views on Microsoft, Bed, Bath & Beyond, Yeti, PayPal, and Others

    Also, analysts’ views on Bed, Bath & Beyond, New York Community Bancorp, Yeti, PayPal, and U.S. Bancorp

  • GuruFocus.com

    Warren Buffett on Junk Bonds, Part 1

    The guru's analysis of deteriorating corporate credit standards in 1990 was extremely prescient Continue reading...

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Fox News veteran Shepard Smith quits; hopes 'facts will win the day'

    Shepard Smith, the chief news anchor of Fox News and a sometime critic of U.S. President Donald Trump, abruptly quit the network on Friday after 23 years. In an unexpected on-air statement at the end of his daily "Shepard Smith Reporting" show, Smith said he had asked to leave the conservative-leaning cable news network, which is the most-watched in the United States. "Recently I asked the company to allow me to leave Fox News.

  • Top Margin-Expanding Companies From the US and China
    GuruFocus.com

    Top Margin-Expanding Companies From the US and China

    Trump and Chinese officials reach first phase of landmark trade deal Continue reading...

  • Google’s $2.6 Billion Looker Deal Said to Get Closer DOJ Review
    Bloomberg

    Google’s $2.6 Billion Looker Deal Said to Get Closer DOJ Review

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. antitrust enforcers have started an in-depth review of Google’s $2.6 billion planned acquisition of a data analytics company, a further sign of greater scrutiny on big technology companies, according to people familiar with the situation.The antitrust division of the Justice Department is seeking more information from Google and Looker Data Sciences Inc. related to the deal to determine whether the tie-up harms competition, said one of the people, who asked not to be named discussing private matters.Alphabet Inc.’s Google announced June 6 it planned to buy Looker for its cloud unit, which lags far behind Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. with just 4% of the cloud-computing infrastructure market as of 2018, according to the most-recent figures from analyst Gartner Inc.The deal was expected to receive added regulatory scrutiny. The in-depth Justice Department review, known as a “second request,” comes as antitrust authorities start historic probes of Google and other large tech companies. One issue for enforcers is whether tech giants have used acquisitions of smaller firms to thwart rivals and cement their dominance. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which also enforces antitrust laws, is investigating whether Facebook Inc.’s purchases of Instagram and WhatsApp were anti-competitive.Representatives from Google, Looker and the Justice Department declined to comment.The Justice Department and a coalition of attorneys general made up of most U.S. states in the country have opened antitrust cases against Google. Those probes are mostly focused on the company’s dominant search and advertising businesses.Looker, closely held and based in Santa Cruz, California, provides tools that lets companies analyze their data stored in the cloud, a service that competes with offerings from Amazon and Microsoft. When Google announced the deal, its cloud chief, Thomas Kurian, said the company would continue to let Looker customers use other cloud providers. Google doesn’t share cloud sales.Google once spent lavishly on companies, dropping billions on device makers Motorola and Nest, as well as experimental tech like satellites and robots. More recently, the company’s acquisitions have mostly been relatively small deals in the cloud sector.It’s common for antitrust authorities to open in-depth investigations for sizable mergers, but more recently have faced criticism for allowing large tech companies to buy startups as a way to gain footholds in new markets. That charge has been aimed at Google after its takeovers of Waze, DoubleClick and YouTube. The Justice Department in July announced a broad antitrust review of the big internet platforms in search, social media and online retail.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Bergen in San Francisco at mbergen10@bloomberg.net;Sarah McBride in San Francisco at smcbride24@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, ;Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Trade Deal Is ‘Game Changer’ for Tech Stocks, Wedbush Says

    (Bloomberg) -- The partial U.S.-China trade agreement is a “game changer” for technology stocks, at least according to one analyst.The deal announced by President Trump in the last hour of trading on Friday points to “brighter days” in relations between the two countries and makes it unlikely the U.S. will follow through with the more than $160 billion in tariffs slated to take effect Dec. 15, Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives said. Concerns around those tariffs have resulted in a 10% to 15% discount on U.S. technology stocks by his estimation and the removal could “unleash a ‘risk on’ scenario” into year-end.Technology stocks had rallied throughout Friday’s session on speculation that some form of trade agreement was near. The shares pared some of those gains as investors realized that several of the thorniest issues, including those related to Huawei Technologies Co., remain unresolved. Huawei, which was blacklisted earlier this year, is a major buyer of U.S. electronic components.The late pullback wasn’t enough to prevent Apple Inc. from closing at a record and overtaking Microsoft Corp. as the world’s most valuable company. Greater China accounted for about 17% of Apple’s revenue in the fiscal third quarter and is home to a key portion of its supply chain. The Philadelphia semiconductor index also notched a 2.3% gain for the session, its best performance in a month.To contact the reporter on this story: Jeran Wittenstein in San Francisco at jwittenstei1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.